Should I Incorporate?  -  The new dividend tax has arrived and as from 6 April 2016 individuals can earn up to £5,000 in dividends without any income tax charge, but any amounts received above this level will be taxed at 7.5%, 32.5% and 38.1% depending on your tax band.

The Chancellor has already taken some of the shine off tax-motivated incorporation by excluding goodwill transferred to a related company from qualifying for CGT entrepreneurs' relief and from corporation tax relief for amortisation of intangible assets so is it still worth incorporating?

  • How will the dividend tax affect people already running one-man companies?

    The table below shows the total tax bill (i.e. both corporation and income tax combined) for one-person companies with profits of £50,000, £100,000 and £150,000. The calculations assume a salary equal to the NIC primary threshold (£8,060 for both years) and that all post-tax profits are paid as dividends. The resulting tax figures are rounded to the nearest £100.

    Total tax bills for a one-person company:

    Total tax bill
    2015/16 2016/17 Increase
    Profit:
    £50,000 £8,800 £10,300 £1,500
    £100,000 £28,800 £33,000 £4,200
    £150,000 £53,000 £60,500 £7,500

    So small companies face substantial increases in their total tax bills as a result of the dividend tax. The percentage increase in the total tax bill ranges from 14% to 17%.

  • What about a ‘husband and wife’ family business?

    A comparison of the tax bills for a two-person company, where profits are divided equally, shows the total tax bill will be higher in 2016/17 at all three levels of profit.

    The percentage increases are similar to single-person companies, ranging from 12% to 17%.

    Total tax bills for a two-person company:

    Total tax bill
    2015/16 2016/17 Increase
    Profit:
    £50,000 £6,800 £7,600 £800
    £100,000 £17,600 £20,600 £3,000
    £150,000 £37,600 £42,900 £5,300
  • Tax savings from working via a single-person company v self-employment

    So, given these tax rises, does it still make sense to incorporate?

    The answer is yes, but only if profits are below a certain level. The table below shows the tax savings achieved by switching from a sole trader to a single-person company for various profit levels.

    Tax savings achieved by working through a single-person company v self-employment:

    Tax saving from incorporation
    2015/16 2016/17
    Profit:
    £50,000 £4,000 £2,300
    £75,000 £4,500 £1,700
    £100,000 £5,000 £700*
    £125,000 £7,400 £3,800*
    £150,000 £6,000 (£1,400)

    * The tax saving from incorporation is higher when profits are £125,000 versus £100,000 because the personal allowance of a sole trader is scaled back sooner than someone drawing (post-tax) dividends from a company. However the tax saving from incorporation starts falling again when this effect ends.

    Although the tax savings are substantially lower than in 2015/16, incorporation still makes sense for businesses with profits below £150,000. But a business with profits at (or higher than) this level will be better off working as a sole trader.

  • Tax savings from working via a two-person company v partnership

    Is the same true for a husband and wife business? If we compare a partnership to a two-person company, where profits are split equally in both cases, incorporation still makes sense provided profits are below £300,000.

    Tax savings from working via a two-person company v partnership:

    Tax saving from incorporation
    2015/16 2016/17
    Profit:
    £50,000 £2,300 £1,300
    £100,000 £8,000 £4,600
    £150,000 £9,000 £3,300
    £200,000 £10,000 £1,300
    £250,000 £14,900 £7,600
    £300,000 £12,000 (£2,900)

    So what can we conclude from the analysis above?

     

    The first point is tax bills are going to be higher for small companies across the board, and business owners need to start setting more money aside. The rise will vary according to circumstances, but a good rule of thumb is tax bills in 2016/17 will be 15% higher than in the previous year.

     

    The second point is it still makes sense to operate via a limited company provided profits are below a certain level - £150,000 for a single-person business and £300,000 for a two-person firm. Businesses earning (or expecting to earn) more than these amounts should look at alternatives, including LLPs if limited liability is an important issue.

     

    But, all in all, it still makes sense for many small businesses to operate via companies and tax-driven incorporation is likely to continue.

Under the new rules tax bills will be higher for small companies. A good rule of thumb is tax bills in 2016/17 will be 15% higher than in the previous year. It still makes sense to operate via a limited company provided profits are below £150,000 for a single-person business and £300,000 for a two-person firm.

Other advantages / disadvantages of incorporation:
Advantages
Tax reduction
Salary & dividend flexibility
Status as a company
Limited liability
Disadvantages
More detailed accounts
Accounting costs higher
Adds complexity to mortgage applications

Registered to carry out audit work by the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants - auditregister.org.uk 8011438

       Services

Member of the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants
Phone

01332 202660

61 Friar Gate - Derby - DE1 1DJ

Tax planning
Tax problems